OpenFlow

Years ago I wrote about building a secure network in a box. Over a weekend I decided to revisit this concept thanks to a colleague at work wanting to do something similar. It got me thinking “a lot has changed since I last did this” and it felt like time to revisit it. Well, disappointment wasn’t in the cards because it’s easier, smarter, and more flexible now that it was back then. As I noted back in 2013 when I wrote that last post, OVS was a lot less well traveled and, frankly, there was not…

Remember OpenFlow? It was the media and marketing darling for the better part of 5 years as “the machine” conflated OpenFlow with SDN and SDN with - almost literally - everything. “Still Does Nothing” was a common phrase uttered around those of us that had run large scale, complex networks for a long time. Quietly, and mostly, out of the fickle media and blogosphere eye, a scrappy little SDN project called faucet has been diligently plugging away – making easy to use,…

When NEC began talking about SDN at Network Field Day 9, I was not sure what to expect. I knew they had been heavily involved with openflow since the early days, and many years ago I was able to get my hands on their early OpenFlow controller and was immediately frustrated by its cryptic nature and frankly, poor documentation. Their switches were fine and were heavily utilized in early OpenFlow deployments. I knew they had decent support and were squarely on board the SDN train. Their…

I was recently granted access to the beta BigSwitch Networks lab site, a purpose built classroom in the cloud focused on teaching the BigSwitch SDN environment.  I had seen some of the BSN offerings in the past and always held them in high regard, but I was thoroughly impressed with both the completeness of the lab and how polished the controller environment was.Screenshot 2014-09-12 10.28.50 At the time of this writing, the lab consists of 3 modules: Building cloud fabric, monitoring fabric and dynamic provisioning of…

As part of a larger fun project I’m working on (OVS for the ALIX platform; more to come on that once I have it 100% working), I have been playing a lot with OVS.  It’s a great platform, and as others have mentioned, it’s as close to an SDN reference data plane implementation as we have.  I’d be surprised if many if not all commercial implementations of OpenFlow aren’t based on OVS.  Anyway, I wanted to build debian packages since I’d never done it before and…

I had the need to build a FlowVisor instance under CentOS.  Since nearly all of the docs I could find were for debian, I threw this together.  I utilized this GENI doc and the github docs as a simple reference.  This is the quick and dirty method I used: Install the prerequisites:``` sudo yum -y install ant eclipse java-1.6.0-openjdk.x86_64 git sudo yum -y groupinstall “Development Tools”

Jon Langemak has a great write up on building the OpenDaylight controller under CentOS. Since I’ll have to do this a bunch of times, I though tI’d take what he so generously put online and build a very rudimentary script for deploying ODC under CentOS. The prerequisites are that you already have an account and ssh key at the OpenDaylight GIT repo and that you disable SELinux. Here is the script:``` #!/bin/bash

I had been working, off and on, on a how-to for building the daylight openflow controller under CentOS.  Most openflow docs and dev are done under ubuntu or debian, and while those are both fantastic alternatives, there are a huge number of folks that will want or need to use RHEL or CentOS. So, seeing as that is the case, having someone be mindful of that is important.  When I saw the write up by Jon Langemak, I scrapped my attempt at a how-to since his was so much better. If you’re not…

OpenFlow is, of course, a hot buzzword.  It’s the newest, and in my opinion, the most innovative thing to hit data networking since dynamic routing.  The ability to programmatically, systematically and potentially dynamically control traffic at the flow level through a network is innovative, exciting and terrifying [to many network engineers and architects] at the same time.  Allowing applications to touch the network change behavior is something that many engineers are not terribly…

The SDN world is abuzz with the announcement that the OpenDaylight controller came from stealth mode today.  Why is this important?  Well, SDN and OpenFlow are fractured.  It is Mac vs. PC, Beta vs VHS, Coke vs. Pepsi all over again……multiplied by 100x and with a handful of players. logo_opendaylight Vendor zealots and brand loyalists will nearly always side with their camp.  Heck, even I have some biases of personal preference.  But at the end of the day, the greater good is always most important.…