NIX4NetEng

Small to medium ISPs are an interesting phenomenon. Early in my career I was pretty heavily involved in that space, so much of my current thought processes and methodologies are heavily informed by that experience. Something that never ceases to amaze me today is that the practice of scripting and “automating” things seems to have become somewhat of a lost art, or at the very least it is not part of an initial deployment plan. As I learned to operate a network at scale and with efficiency, we…

There is no shortage of network telemetry data that can be collected, recorded, graphed, and stored for cross reference and triage. Not one to be underestimated, latency at a can be incredibly powerful when leveraged for baseline and deviation notification. As I have eluded to in the past, there are many tools in this space. I have written about a few of them in detail and touched on others in passing. Regardless of the tool, the data is powerful and the instrumentation they provide will only…

There is no shortage of network telemetry data that can be collected, recorded, graphed, and stored for cross reference and triage. Not one to be underestimated, latency at a can be incredibly powerful when leveraged for baseline and deviation notification. As I have eluded to in the past, there are many tools in this space. I have written about a few of them in detail and touched on others in passing. Regardless of the tool, the data is powerful and the instrumentation they provide will only…

Configuration management is a critical part of successfully and efficiently run any network. From the early days of networking there have been options for doing configuration backup. Several projects have been around for literally decades, enabling the backup of a myriad of critical network devices and providing historical archives. Many of these projects and platforms require a reasonable amount of unix experience and perhaps some development skills. I’m going to give a quick synopsis of my…

Anyone that looks at this site with any regularity may have noticed that I have been pretty remiss in adding posts - for that I apologize, things have been busy. However, I have not been absent in the tech world…quite the opposite, in fact. I’ve been spending more and more time on podcasts and other forms of tech media which I have not provided links for here. So, to help expose that, here are a few of the other media resources I’ve been popping up in. Professionally…

In the last few years I have moved all of my virtualization to proxmox and docker. Seeing as I like to look at packets because I am a closet security guy, and being as I have been working off-and-on on a security project in recent times, I wanted to be able to span a port not only from a hardware switch, but also within my software switches. I had been using linux bridge, which I am not a fan of, so when I started down this path I did not look hard to find a way to do so under that platform.…

The sixth [and arguably very overdue] installment of my NIX4NetEng series, this began as an overly complex diatribe about DNS. As it evolved, I realized that DNS is so complex and far reaching that it could never be contained in one meager post. DNS is a powerful tool. It has existed for so long that many that have never had the responsibility of running an authoritative or recursive resolver may take for granted the extensive reach of a tool so engrained in the fabric of the internet that it is…

Sometimes in networking and security it becomes necessary to do lookups of location data on IP addresses and prefixes. On my Mac I use homebrew to manage packages, but most of these tools are available with thetypocal apt, yum and port package management systems. For this post, I’m going to shift gears and show the install on my mac:``` sliver:~ buraglio$ brew install geoip ==> Downloading https://downloads.sf.net/project/machomebrew/Bottles/geoip-1.6.3.mavericks.bottle.tar.gz…

With the recent release of the POODLE SSLv3 vulnerability, folks are scrambling around trying to figure out what runs what and where.  Running a handful of things that do SSL, I was obligated, both personally and professionally, to figure out an easy way to drill down and figure out what does what and then fix the vulnerable services.  When there are a lot of devices, this can seem like a daunting task, and it is if you’re trying to do it manually.  This is where NMAP comes into play.…

IP addressing and subnetting is a common interview subject. I assert that memorizing these things is useful for learning the concepts but ultimately futile in that it is time consuming and inefficient use of engineering time when tools can be utilized to accomplish the same goals in less time with fewer errors. Honestly, I gave up doing this kind of work manually around 10 years ago and have never regretted it, and in actuality, I’d probably struggle to do it at this point because…